CHANGE UNIVERSE: Magazine Jewels
Hong Kong | Food & DrinksOctober 31, 2012

Street Food Extravaganza

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In Hong Kong, street food can be found on almost every corner. I have a few hours free this afternoon and found no candidate who is brave enough to come with me and explore the scenery and maybe try a few dishes. Against my mother advise I decide to go for the experience and after all I got the best companion ever,  my  Cannon Mar II. I have sneaked in several back streets, hidden alleys and main avenues.

Some notable foods include skewered beef, curry fish balls, (even 7-11 sells fish balls by their cashier registers in Hong Kong!), stuffed peppers and mushrooms, and dim sum on a stick. Street side food vendors are called gaai bin dong which means in traditional Chinese “street side stalls”.

In Mongkok, there are a number of street food restaurants that jet into the middle of the sidewalk to tempt pedestrians with strange skewers of bacon wrapped meat and various forms of fried chicken! Wonton noodle soup with giant meaty chunks of beef brisket – it had an incredible pure taste of beef to it.  Fresh egg noodles ,  shrimp wonton , not to be missed the cream filled pancakes ,Shanghai style soup dumplings,dim Sum, Chinese glutinous rice steamed in a lotus leaf (Lou Mai Gai), The beancurd rolls (called San Juk Guen with fatty pork .

And from  the greasy grinds of Mongkok to the international recipes surrounding the Chungking Mansion, Hong Kong has it all! After a few inquires I have created below a list of the most common food and street food dishes along with some interesting photos. Enjoy!
Egg Puffs (also called as Gei Dan Jai, Egg Waffles, Eggettes or in Chineseis a famous Hong Kong style waffle usually made and sold by street hawkers and eaten warm on the street. They are best served fresh from the iron. These eggettes are crispy on the outside and taste like little, airy waffle bites. Egg, sugar and evaporated milk are used to make egg puff giving them a sweet flavor. They are made from a sweet batter that is cooked on a hot griddle, a special frying pan with small round “wells”. The egg batter is poured over the special frying pan and heated; the small ovals of eggettes are thus formed. If you’re in Hong Kong, you can pick some up at Lee Ken Egg Waffles located at at 78 Nathan Road, Jordan (heading towards Tsim Tsa Tsui)

 Bak kwa, Sweet pork jerky meat is another popular street food in Hong Kong. The most popular is Bee Cheng Hiang  based out of Singapore but with dozens of shops located throughout Hong Kong. Bak kwa is smoked and roasted strips of pork with a consistency similar to jerky. It is often given as gifts during holidays and is a popular snack to eat on the streets. My favorite was the Gourmet Fusion style which was sweet and had the consistency of a Asian bacon.

For dessert, some popular items are the tong but lut (sweet glutinous rice balls topped with ground peanuts and white sesame) and for summer time, mango pomelo sago soup. This dessert is made with fresh mango fruit, sweet sago cream, sour pomelo fruit and mango juice Honey Moon Dessert was one of the more prevalent places that could be found throughout Hong Kong where you can get some of these desserts.

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